A few more videos

Topics relating to Advanced Riding on bikes
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GTR1400MAN
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Re: A few more videos

Postby GTR1400MAN » Mon Nov 18, 2019 3:15 pm

I've added a new video to my YouTube channel

Using IPSGA on wet autumn roads. This video concentrates on the postion phase of IPSGA.
Mike Roberts - Now riding a Triumph Explorer XRT. My username comes from my 50K miles on a Kawasaki 1400GTR, after many years on Hondas of various shapes and styles. - https://tinyurl.com/mikerobertsonyoutube

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GTR1400MAN
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Re: A few more videos

Postby GTR1400MAN » Mon Nov 25, 2019 12:06 pm

Here's another. The last video created a lot of discussion (on the ROSPA Facebook page) about the use of the acronym IPSGA. Let's see if this one can get some comments on the riding ;)

This time not demoing/commentating but instead some everyday riding, without the background influence of 'making a video' influencing the ride. However, subtly.


Using The Roadcraft System of Motorcycle Control on wet autumn roads in Suffolk. This is some raw footage of an everyday ride without any commentary, so you can see the system being used outside of a demonstration.
Mike Roberts - Now riding a Triumph Explorer XRT. My username comes from my 50K miles on a Kawasaki 1400GTR, after many years on Hondas of various shapes and styles. - https://tinyurl.com/mikerobertsonyoutube

crr003
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Re: A few more videos

Postby crr003 » Mon Nov 25, 2019 4:19 pm

GTR1400MAN wrote:Here's another. The last video created a lot of discussion (on the ROSPA Facebook page) about the use of the acronym IPSGA. Let's see if this one can get some comments on the riding ;)

Some quite bizarre comments about IPSGA on the FB page....

It would have been nice to see the speed displayed - the other vehicles seemed to have an interesting concept of speed.

5:29 - how many goes did it take to trigger the SID at 29?? 8-)
9:28 - As a lifelong cager I'd have been concerned about going over that metal manhole cover. Would you normally try and miss those but the bend meant staying over it or does years of riding tell you it's OK?
18:14 - Would you normally offside that without the oncoming vehicle? I sensed a movement towards that.

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Horse
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Re: A few more videos

Postby Horse » Mon Nov 25, 2019 5:26 pm

crr003 wrote: 9:28 - As a lifelong cager I'd have been concerned about going over that metal manhole cover. Would you normally try and miss those but the bend meant staying over it or does years of riding tell you it's OK?


Many motorcyclists will swerve all over the road to avoid inspection covers. Understandably, for fear of nil-grip metal.

However, if you're travelling at any speed*, you'll only be on it for a few moments and [caveats apply] any grip that's lost would usually be regained as soon as the tyres reach good surface again.

the times when I'd certainly change line are if they're raised** or dropped, but I have a theory that more riders have probably crashed in corners by trying (and failing) to avoid the cover but actually clipping it at an angle, possibly with the throttle shut, perhaps even panic braking.

* I was pulling away from a T junction, in the dark and wet, and ended up with my rear wheel on a flat and level inspection cover. The rear wheel span, I sat there with my feet up, for what felt like several seconds (but probably wasn't) until it slipped sideways, got some grip and away we went. :P :o 8-)

** Southern Television (pre-TVS, pre-Meridian) had a series called 'Talking Bikes'. One programme featured the Dunlop tyre testers. Long curved track, with a radial ridge about 2" high. Bike whizzing into view at about 60mph, sparks flying as he's leant over and grounding the stand. Voiceover: "This test is . . . " CRUNCH daylight under tyres, second crunch as it lands and continues on around the corner " . . . is to test how tyres regain their grip". :o :hit:
Your 'standard' is how you drive alone, not how you drive during a test.

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Horse
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Re: A few more videos

Postby Horse » Mon Nov 25, 2019 5:30 pm

If you have a few moments and want a giggle, here are the two guys at work (but, sadly, not the clip I mentioned):

Your 'standard' is how you drive alone, not how you drive during a test.

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GTR1400MAN
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Re: A few more videos

Postby GTR1400MAN » Mon Nov 25, 2019 5:33 pm

crr003 wrote:Some quite bizarre comments about IPSGA on the FB page....

Yep, it got quite heated in places ... but I'm one of those nasty IAM guys who's corrupting The System with awful acronyms. ;)

crr003 wrote:It would have been nice to see the speed displayed - the other vehicles seemed to have an interesting concept of speed.

I never broke the limit once. Loads of dawdlers.

crr003 wrote:5:29 - how many goes did it take to trigger the SID at 29?? 8-)

I know my speedo well ;)
crr003 wrote:9:28 - As a lifelong cager I'd have been concerned about going over that metal manhole cover. Would you normally try and miss those but the bend meant staying over it or does years of riding tell you it's OK?

Ah, manholes. This often comes up with Associates. If I can miss them smoothly I will. Sadly we often see people doing quite violent moves to miss them, causing more danger than riding over one! That one, I wanted the position for the corner and I was upright at the time. On a bike if leaning it is best to clip the outside edge (less distance to slide). I always ask those who get really uptight about NOT riding over ANY what they do at night?
Edit: See also Horse's reply that he typed in parallel with mine.
crr003 wrote:18:14 - Would you normally offside that without the oncoming vehicle? I sensed a movement towards that.

Who? Moi? :roll: Great observation (by me as well ;) ) We'll make a biker of you yet! :)
Mike Roberts - Now riding a Triumph Explorer XRT. My username comes from my 50K miles on a Kawasaki 1400GTR, after many years on Hondas of various shapes and styles. - https://tinyurl.com/mikerobertsonyoutube

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GTR1400MAN
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Re: A few more videos

Postby GTR1400MAN » Mon Nov 25, 2019 5:37 pm

Horse wrote:If you have a few moments and want a giggle, here are the two guys at work (but, sadly, not the clip I mentioned):


I've seen this before Horse. There is something odd about this video. I've ridden some of the horrors of the late 70s early 80s and never had a bike weave THAT bad. Lots of my colleagues also watch this and remembered our days abroad in those times. While the bikes were nowhere near as stable as modern, easy to ride, missiles we have now, they didn't weave like this.
Mike Roberts - Now riding a Triumph Explorer XRT. My username comes from my 50K miles on a Kawasaki 1400GTR, after many years on Hondas of various shapes and styles. - https://tinyurl.com/mikerobertsonyoutube

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Horse
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Re: A few more videos

Postby Horse » Mon Nov 25, 2019 8:47 pm

GTR1400MAN wrote:
Horse wrote:If you have a few moments and want a giggle, here are the two guys at work

I've seen this before Horse. There is something odd about this video. I've ridden some of the horrors of the late 70s early 80s and never had a bike weave THAT bad. Lots of my colleagues also watch this and remembered our days abroad in those times. While the bikes were nowhere near as stable as modern, easy to ride, missiles we have now, they didn't weave like this.


Actually, I expected you would have, it was more for entertainment of the non-riders.

There were many examples of 70s bikes being 'unsteady', ranging from things like the Suzuki GT380 a friend had, which progressed in a steady weave at the back end. He didn't know until someone told him. That someone also had one, so they reversed order and the other one was doing it too.

I can't remember (haven't watched it recently), does that video include the slow motion shot of the forks moving independently? Fork braces used to be a common upgrade to prevent that.

In the late 80s, the police had a series of crashes (R series twins), sadly with fatalities. From a discussion with someone involved, it was due to the rear-mounted radio mounting.

There's no doubt that bikes have had many of the handling woes engineered-out. Far more rigid forks being one example. It's also fairly obvious that the scenes in wobble and weave were set for worst case.
Your 'standard' is how you drive alone, not how you drive during a test.

crr003
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Re: A few more videos

Postby crr003 » Thu Nov 28, 2019 3:26 pm

Horse wrote:
GTR1400MAN wrote:
Horse wrote:If you have a few moments and want a giggle, here are the two guys at work

I've seen this before Horse. There is something odd about this video. I've ridden some of the horrors of the late 70s early 80s and never had a bike weave THAT bad. Lots of my colleagues also watch this and remembered our days abroad in those times. While the bikes were nowhere near as stable as modern, easy to ride, missiles we have now, they didn't weave like this.


Actually, I expected you would have, it was more for entertainment of the non-riders.

Entertainment! It's frightening!

Good to know the safest way to deal with it is to get heavier. That explains the biker predilection with bacon butties and cake.

crr003
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Re: A few more videos

Postby crr003 » Thu Nov 28, 2019 4:32 pm

GTR1400MAN wrote:...
crr003 wrote:18:14 - Would you normally offside that without the oncoming vehicle? I sensed a movement towards that.

Who? Moi? :roll: Great observation (by me as well ;) ) We'll make a biker of you yet! :)

Never! A wheel at each corner as "the science" infers.


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