A Very Good Read

Technology in driving is becoming more dominant...
Triquet
Posts: 268
Joined: Tue Sep 29, 2015 7:32 pm

A Very Good Read

Postby Triquet » Tue May 07, 2019 1:12 pm

My daughter has just drawn my attention to this. It is well worth a read ....

https://www.businessweekly.co.uk/news/a ... y2OeMjoD1A

:racing:

vanman
Posts: 157
Joined: Sat Oct 10, 2015 4:16 pm
Location: Caterham Surrey

Re: A Very Good Read

Postby vanman » Tue May 07, 2019 6:29 pm

Looks like jont-'s job is safe for at least the next ten years then. :lol:
Not a bad career prospect in this day and age. :o

User avatar
Horse
Posts: 2245
Joined: Mon Sep 28, 2015 9:20 am

Re: A Very Good Read

Postby Horse » Wed May 08, 2019 8:24 pm

Here's another short read from FiveAI, which perhaps contrasts UK autonomous vehicle testing with testing in some other parts of the world:

https://medium.com/@_FiveAI/the-human-t ... 96b9859ffe

My suspicion would be that no-one in the UK who is actually involved in the testing of such vehicles would give you anything other than timescales way into the future before they ever become anything near commonplace. Automated, yes, that's here. Autonomous, as in full L5, 'no steering wheel'? Probably not in the next ...
Your 'standard' is how you drive alone, not how you drive during a test.

User avatar
jont-
Posts: 1118
Joined: Mon Sep 28, 2015 7:12 am
Location: Flatlands

Re: A Very Good Read

Postby jont- » Thu May 09, 2019 6:18 am

I've always wanted to ask the folk developing AVs in the lovely California (or Nevada) sunshine how it would cope on a Welsh B-road on a foggy, wet December night....

User avatar
Horse
Posts: 2245
Joined: Mon Sep 28, 2015 9:20 am

Re: A Very Good Read

Postby Horse » Thu May 09, 2019 11:36 am

Well, I can tell you that it might cope better than a human. But it might not.

It would, of course, depend on what systems the vehicle is using and whether (as often happens with much/all [?] current UK testing) the vehicle is operating on a pre-planned route that has been assessed for suitability and electronically mapped.

However, what should be fairly certain is that it should drive within its limits for 'vision' and stopping. Shame you can't say the same for many humans :)
Your 'standard' is how you drive alone, not how you drive during a test.

vanman
Posts: 157
Joined: Sat Oct 10, 2015 4:16 pm
Location: Caterham Surrey

Re: A Very Good Read

Postby vanman » Thu May 09, 2019 12:08 pm

jont- wrote:I've always wanted to ask the folk developing AVs in the lovely California (or Nevada) sunshine how it would cope on a Welsh B-road on a foggy, wet December night....

Some years ago I was involved in commisioning a tracking system above Pendine Sands. The system was from the states and worked perfectly in Nevada and the Middle East, yep you guessed it,took months to get to work in Wales. :oops:

User avatar
Horse
Posts: 2245
Joined: Mon Sep 28, 2015 9:20 am

Re: A Very Good Read

Postby Horse » Thu May 09, 2019 5:10 pm

vanman wrote:
jont- wrote:I've always wanted to ask the folk developing AVs in the lovely California (or Nevada) sunshine how it would cope on a Welsh B-road on a foggy, wet December night....

Some years ago I was involved in commisioning a tracking system above Pendine Sands. The system was from the states and worked perfectly in Nevada and the Middle East, yep you guessed it,took months to get to work in Wales. :oops:


Mae'n debyg na allai ddeall y cyfarwyddiadau :)
Your 'standard' is how you drive alone, not how you drive during a test.

User avatar
Horse
Posts: 2245
Joined: Mon Sep 28, 2015 9:20 am

Re: A Very Good Read

Postby Horse » Fri May 10, 2019 9:18 am

Horse wrote:Well, I can tell you that it might cope better than a human. But it might not.

It would, of course, depend on what systems the vehicle is using and whether (as often happens with much/all [?] current UK testing) the vehicle is operating on a pre-planned route that has been assessed for suitability and electronically mapped.

However, what should be fairly certain is that it should drive within its limits for 'vision' and stopping. Shame you can't say the same for many humans :)


Just to emphasise the difference in UK and 'other' testing regimes:

https://www.highwaysindustry.com/could- ... -vehicles/

Excerpt:
In his 2018 budget, Chancellor Phillip Hammond stated that we could we see autonomous vehicles on British roads by 2021. However, some argue that the CAVs that we can expect to see within that time frame, although technically autonomous as defined by the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE), do not meet the criteria of a fully-autonomous, self-driving vehicle – a so called ‘Level 5’.

All currently available CAVs still require someone to drive the vehicle, even when driver support systems are engaged. However, the vehicles envisioned for UK roads by 2021, although still requiring someone to sit in the driver’s seat, will not require a driver while the support systems are in effect.

These types of vehicles are already being extensively trialled in the US and China, both countries that already boast CAV unicorns. Waymo have been running fully automated, Level 4 vehicle tests on Arizonan streets since 2016; The Alphabet subsidiary has been developing the technology since 2009.

In the UK, car and technology companies have made significant investments into the development of this technology. However, the UK – and Europe in general – has fallen behind the CAV curve.

Why hasn’t the UK realised its autonomous vehicle potential?

The streets of London are unlike those you’ll find in Phoenix, Arizona. In the US city, it hardly ever rains, the roads are built largely at perpendicular angles and there is significant satellite coverage.

London, by contrast, experiences lots of rain and even the occasional snow flurry, the streets were originally built to accommodate horse and carriages, not cars, and there are large parts of the capital that don’t receive satellite coverage.

Outside of London, only 58 percent of roads throughout the UK currently have 4G access, making any trials or wide-spread roll outs near-impossible. Andy Palmer, president and group CEO at Aston Martin Lagonda told attendees at the biannual SMMT conference earlier this year that a “wholesale rollout of this technology without infrastructure or maturity is reckless.”
Your 'standard' is how you drive alone, not how you drive during a test.

Triquet
Posts: 268
Joined: Tue Sep 29, 2015 7:32 pm

Re: A Very Good Read

Postby Triquet » Fri May 10, 2019 9:44 am

“wholesale rollout of this technology without infrastructure or maturity is reckless.”

Exactly. And IMHO early roll-out could lead to some very nasty incidents, followed by some very tortuous legal arguments.

User avatar
jont-
Posts: 1118
Joined: Mon Sep 28, 2015 7:12 am
Location: Flatlands

Re: A Very Good Read

Postby jont- » Fri May 10, 2019 11:00 am

Triquet wrote:“wholesale rollout of this technology without infrastructure or maturity is reckless.”

Exactly. And IMHO early roll-out could lead to some very nasty incidents, followed by some very tortuous legal arguments.

Already has. See the various lawsuits against Tesla around "autopilot" causing fatalities, and there was the Uber fatal crash too.


Return to “Technology”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest