BBC article on driver awareness courses

Articles of interest to the AD community, currently in the news.
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Horse
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Re: BBC article on driver awareness courses

Postby Horse » Thu Jun 23, 2016 12:20 pm

GTR1400MAN wrote:Scare tactics have been shown not to work in any case. Bravado and general de-sensitisation (via television and the internet) has seen to that.


The prevailing viewpoint among some behavioural scientists and health promotion professionals and practitioners is to avoid threat appeals or to use them with great caution (Elliott, 2003; Elliott, 2005; Shanahan et al., 2000). Similar to the fear-persuasion literature in general, mixed and inconsistent findings have been reported in relation to threat appeals utilized in the road safety advertising context (Ben-Ari et al., 2000). Whilst innumerable attempts have been undertaken to reconcile the disparate findings through identifying key moderating factors and methodological limitations of the available studies, the fact that so many other intervening factors influence the fear-persuasion relationship has lead some to suggest that the use of such appeals is too risky and complicated (Elliott, 2003). The most consistent and definitive conclusions appear to be in relation to the importance, not of fear arousal but, of relevance (i.e, vulnerability) and provision of coping strategies and recommendations that an individual can effectively enact to avoid or prevent a threat from occurring (i.e., efficacy).

Moreover, the concern associated with the frequent use (and preference) of strong physical threats to target young males was highlighted. For instance, it was suggested that, “eliciting fear of personal death may not be always necessarily the most appropriate way to change dangerous behaviour” (Ben-Ari et al., 2000, p. 8; see also Henley & Donovan, 2003). Given that young males represent a high risk road user group yet, appear less influenced by physical appeals intending to target them (Lewis et al., 2007b; Tay, 2002), this evidence provides perhaps one of the most significant challenges to the effectiveness and continued use of strong (physical) threat appeals in the road safety context. Consequently, it seems more than justified to explore the effectiveness of alternative approaches (which may or may not be threat-based). Any reductions in the road trauma among this high risk road user group would have significant implications not only for road safety but for public health generally.

In conclusion, without doubt, the issue of whether or not to use threat appeals in road safety advertising as well as health advertising more generally, will continue to be contentious and prompt debate among researchers and practitioners. Perhaps, the most sound recommendation for anyone considering the use of threat appeals is to ensure that thorough pre-testing and qualitative research be conducted to examine the relevance of the intended message among the target audience as well as to ensure that it elicits high levels of efficacy and vulnerability.

The role of fear appeals in improving driver safety:
A review of the effectiveness of fear-arousing (threat) appeals in road safety advertising
Lewis, I.1, Watson, B.1, Tay, R.2 & White, K. M.3
My own views. For better or worse :)

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Strangely Brown
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Re: BBC article on driver awareness courses

Postby Strangely Brown » Thu Jun 23, 2016 2:18 pm

jont- wrote:
Strangely Brown wrote:
GTR1400MAN wrote:The excessive speed for the conditions is a little further down.


That'll teach me to read properly.

Highest cause of all accidents: "Driver failed to look properly" :lol:


I think it was actually more like "Driver careless, reckless, or in hurry". :(

TheInsanity1234
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Re: BBC article on driver awareness courses

Postby TheInsanity1234 » Thu Jun 23, 2016 2:40 pm

Strangely Brown wrote:
jont- wrote:
Strangely Brown wrote:
GTR1400MAN wrote:The excessive speed for the conditions is a little further down.


That'll teach me to read properly.

Highest cause of all accidents: "Driver failed to look properly" :lol:


I think it was actually more like "Driver careless, reckless, or in hurry". :(

"Driver failed to look properly" is such a vague statement.

It could mean they were driving far too fast for the conditions, and didn't have enough time to look properly.
It could mean they have failing eyesight and refuse to get glasses.
It could mean they have weak neck muscles, so simply didn't turn their head enough.
It could mean they were busy on their phone.
It could mean they weren't anticipating such an event happening, thus wasn't checking the direction the hazard came from.
It could mean almost anything.

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Strangely Brown
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Re: BBC article on driver awareness courses

Postby Strangely Brown » Thu Jun 23, 2016 3:02 pm

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martine
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Re: BBC article on driver awareness courses

Postby martine » Thu Jun 23, 2016 4:24 pm

jont- wrote:http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-36594584

I didn't realise there was now a 3rd type of course for "suspected intentional offenders".

Oh there's more than 3...

https://ndors.org.uk/courses/

jont- wrote:Looking at those figures for the growth in numbers attending courses, it seems hard to argue it's anything but a cash cow for the operating companies, who presumably also lobby hard for additional enforcement to continue to swell their own coffers? And of course in the face of Brake and the like, it's difficult to say we shouldn't be offering them.

Well speaking from an instructor's view...I can rightly be accused of being biased but...

Almost without exception the people I have had on NDAC courses are, by the end of the afternoon, genuinely thankful for the information and techniques coached and in some cases demo'd. As much as you can in a few hours driving, I get the feeling they will make use of at least some of what we suggest when we aren't sitting alongside. One of the providers shared some follow up info with instructors last year and after 3, 6 and 12 months the majority of attendees say it has changed their driving - even the journalist hints he will.

His suggestion about focussing on the possible consequences of bad driving is a hot topic...'shock' tactics have been shown often not to work - a more subtle approach may be better.

What's important is the NDORS courses, I believe are a genuine attempt to improve driving by education rather than simple fear of a penalty...what's not to like?

I don't understand your link between the growth in numbers and the accusation they are cash cows...NDORS design the courses and allocate providers (and quality-check the instructors). Traffic police decide if someone should be offered the course - depending on the offence and the offender's attitude (if they are stopped). Some courses are run by commercial companies like TTC or AA Drive-Tech and some are run by local councils like Wiltshire and Gloucestershire.
Martin - Bristol IAM: IMI National Observer and Group Secretary, DSA: ADI, Fleet, RoSPA (Dip)


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