Book Promotion

Topics relating to Advanced Riding on bikes
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exportmanuk
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Book Promotion

Postby exportmanuk » Thu Nov 09, 2017 8:27 am

Hi I received the following email yesterday
Good afternoon
My name is Steve Tucker. I am an Advanced Rider Trainer.
Making people better riders is what my colleagues and I achieve.
Your organisation also promotes greater awareness for road safety. I expect within your office like us, you keep a copy of Police Motorcycle Roadcraft close to hand. It's a valuable resource.
On our rides our specialist skills ensure it is an enlightening experience for those we ride with. How do we achieve that? It is a question that my colleague David Rainford and I have been asked many times. This has resulted in the publication of a much needed training handbook for people wishing to be Advanced Rider trainers.
It is titled:Advanced Rider Trainer - The Handbook.
The purpose of the handbook is to give knowledge to its readers, knowledge that they can use whenever they are on their motorbikes.
Anyone who rides a motorbike can benefit from reading the handbook. It is invaluable to perfect training skills for those starting out as a trainer. Existing trainers can perfect their "art" and any rider seeking to improve their riding skills will better understand the techniques of advanced riding.
It is full of information on how to train motorbike riders to advanced level and how to be pro-active not reactive in the world of time, speed and distance. Police Motorcycle Roadcraft is brought to life with techniques on how to train for real life experiences on the roads.
Should you or your colleagues wish to purchase a copy of the Handbook it is available at ₤11.99


Anyone know about this book?
Andrew Melton
Manchester 500

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akirk
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Location: Cotswolds

Re: Book Promotion

Postby akirk » Thu Nov 09, 2017 8:47 am

Maybe ask them to send you a free copy so that you can review it on here - if it is good I have no issue with a link to the book - as long as any review is honest!

Alasdair

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GTR1400MAN
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Re: Book Promotion

Postby GTR1400MAN » Thu Nov 09, 2017 9:15 am

It's on Amazon (out of stock but 3rd party sellers have it).

I've not heard of the two guys who wrote it. Two reviews. One talking about an issue that should have been talked about during the Observer's training and another gushing glowing review.

I may try and find a copy and see what it is all about.
Mike Roberts

IcedKiwi
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Location: Sussex

Re: Book Promotion

Postby IcedKiwi » Thu Nov 09, 2017 12:42 pm

Reading the about the author section, it appears they both moved to Cyprus

Steve Tucker has been riding motor bikes for 40 years. As a UK Traffic Police Officer he was trained in advanced riding and driving skills. Riding a police motor bike in operational situations required a tremendous amount of expertise few riders can ever experience or achieve. Riding a motorbike for pleasure or commuting also requires an exceptional level of skill. Sadly, a large number of crash scenes he attended, where a biker was involved, were generally caused by rider error. When he retired from the Police he used his knowledge and expertise of advanced riding and driving techniques to operate his own business in the UK Driver Training Industry. He achieved an Approved Driving Instructor, Grade 6 (the highest qualification obtainable) and a BTEC Progressive Advanced Driving Instructor at a time when the Industry was only just recognising the need to ensure Instructors were suitably qualified to provide expert training. He now lives in Cyprus where the weather favours riders and provides them with mile after mile of great roads to ride. Riding motorbikes is a passion of Steve's and so is training. So it made a lot of sense to combine both passions and offer advanced rider training to the motorcyclists of Cyprus. Steve is an Advanced Riding Tutor and an Advanced Riding Examiner for (Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents (RoSPA) UK, and the training that he provides is based on Police Motor Cycle Roadcraft. Many riders including the Cyprus National Police and Sovereign Base Area Police Officers have benefited from advanced rider training with him. Advanced Rider Trainer is his first book on the subject.

David Rainford is an Advanced Motorcycle Rider with both the Institute of Advanced Motorists qualification and a RoSPA Gold Award. He is also a RoSPA qualified Advanced Rider Tutor. Now living in Cyprus after a career in engineering design and consultancy, David holds a bachelor degree in Aeronautical Engineering and a Diploma in Company Direction. He is a Chartered Mechanical Engineer and Commercial Drone Pilot. However first and foremost he is a real world biker, with a few lessons he learned the hard way. From falling off his first bike, a Honda C50 step-through, after an Emerson Lake & Palmer concert in 1971 to abusing a Ducati 900SS to cut a deer in half in 2000, David has realized that motorcycle safety comes from proper training and not just the experiences which did not kill or incapacitate the rider. David brings to the book his knowledge of a systematic approach to engineering and management problem solving and considerable experience of staff appraisal, development and training.

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exportmanuk
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Location: Manchester

Re: Book Promotion

Postby exportmanuk » Thu Nov 09, 2017 1:20 pm

IcedKiwi wrote:Reading the about the author section, it appears they both moved to Cyprus


Great place for riding and they use the correct side of the road too:
Andrew Melton
Manchester 500

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GTR1400MAN
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Re: Book Promotion

Postby GTR1400MAN » Tue Nov 14, 2017 2:56 pm

I've ordered a copy. Will post my thoughts one received and read.
Mike Roberts

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GTR1400MAN
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Re: Book Promotion

Postby GTR1400MAN » Mon Nov 20, 2017 11:39 am

It's arrived. Now for some bedtime reading.
Mike Roberts

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GTR1400MAN
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Re: Book Promotion

Postby GTR1400MAN » Tue Nov 21, 2017 6:19 pm

Well, I've read it.

I didn't learn anything new and nearly everything in there would be covered in our Observer training and included in the IMI requirements and 'Full Control'. Maybe some bit's to lesser or greater degrees. It is geared for radio training, though not using radios gets a brief mention.

Would it be of use for a new/trainee Observer to read? Probably, as it's always useful to hear something explained in another way. There's one or two differences in terminology from Roadcraft or what most of us are used to. But just language.

Things I didn't like:

1. It suggests riding on the pupils offside! I had one ROSPA examiner in the past who did this a lot. It really annoyed me as it blocked my view behind.

2. The explanation of cornering using limit point I found a bit confusing. It talked about taking the gear AFTER the limit point starts moving again. I'd want speed and gear dealt with before I tip in. It also introduced something I've not heard before ... the exit point being when the limit point separates/splits and the two sides of the verges open up. I've always explained it as the view of the tarmac appears in conjunction with the limit point rushing away.

3. Overtaking. It talks about following the pupils during overtakes! :o It does warn of the perils but says it's OK once you know how they ride. I'd avoid it at all costs.

4. The usual discussions about left/right foot down and the advocation of back brake only at lower speed/coming to a stop.

5. There's an emphasis on preparing for the test which we try to avoid and concentrate on everyday riding.

I wonder when this was first started being written. It says some bikes are now water cooled as if it's a something new, rather than mainly the norm. Also the pre-ride check acronym is old/different.

So in conclusion another book to add to your collection. It MAY make you think about something differently, but don't expect any earth shattering revelations.
Mike Roberts

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Horse
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Re: Book Promotion

Postby Horse » Tue Nov 21, 2017 7:25 pm

GTR1400MAN wrote:2. The explanation of cornering using limit point I found a bit confusing. It talked about taking the gear AFTER the limit point starts moving again. I'd want speed and gear dealt with before I tip in. It also introduced something I've not heard before ... the exit point being when the limit point separates/splits and the two sides of the verges open up. I've always explained it as the view of the tarmac appears in conjunction with the limit point rushing away.


Difficult to explain/confer but I think I know what he means.

Although the limit point 'arrowhead' rise/fall near/further is a good guide to what the point is doing, the rise / further can happen before you have a full view ahead of both sides of the road.

It depends on what you are doing with the information. If you are maintaining (and intended to continueto do so) a mid-lane position parallel with the verge and centreline, then you can, with the increased view (all things being equal ) start to increase speed.

However, if you are using position for view and intending to use the lane width, then you need to maintain the view position until you have a full view of both verges. A simple guide is [imagine, if you will a plan of L & R hand bends] to extend the line of the verge (nearside on L, offside on R) back to where it crosses your intended path of travel. That is the earliest position where you can alter your line.

So, I guess, that point - where *both* edges are visible - could be said to be where they split.

I think I talked about this at one of the talks I did for Mr CW's RoSPA Group, he may recall?
My own views. For better or worse :)

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GTR1400MAN
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Re: Book Promotion

Postby GTR1400MAN » Wed Nov 22, 2017 8:57 am

But the limit point never splits apart.

As you progress through the corner it slowly moves away from you and as the view of the tarmac opens up it (on a straight road) rushes away from you to infinity ( and beyond :) ). By its very definition (the point where the two sides of the road meet) it can not become TWO points. As I say, a confusing way to explain this.

Also, any thoughts on selecting your gear AFTER the LP starts to move away?
Mike Roberts


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