Looking after cyclists

Topics relating to Advanced Driving in cars
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akirk
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Re: Looking after cyclists

Postby akirk » Mon Sep 19, 2016 7:23 pm

Very true and I gave in, slowed down and pulled over the other day rather than try to force the issue with a 38 tonner! The car doesn't alway give a feeling of security particularly with the roof down which can make you feel quite vulnerable!

Alasdair

fungus
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Re: Looking after cyclists

Postby fungus » Tue Sep 20, 2016 8:21 pm

Isn't there case law from many years ago that states that a cyclist is entitled to a wobble?

As for cycle lanes painted on the road. I'm of the oppinion that they don't make life any safer for cyclists, in fact they may encourage drivers to pass even closer.

Nigel.

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Mr Cholmondeley-Warner
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Re: Looking after cyclists

Postby Mr Cholmondeley-Warner » Tue Sep 20, 2016 8:33 pm

Absolutely not - they encourage car drivers to think they can drive right up to (and over) the edge of the cycle lane, which is usually only a metre wide, or so. Then when cyclists get wise to this and cycle in the main carriageway, they get abuse from car drivers because "you've got a cycle lane, why aren't you in it?". The days when everyone just shared the road, and learnt how to cycle / drive responsibly together, were much more enlightened. I remember cycling proficiency taking place in my primary school playground, allegedly now we have something called Bikeability, although I've never heard of it actually taking place.
Nick

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GTR1400MAN
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Re: Looking after cyclists

Postby GTR1400MAN » Tue Sep 20, 2016 9:13 pm

Mr Cholmondeley-Warner wrote: I remember cycling proficiency taking place in my primary school playground, allegedly now we have something called Bikeability, although I've never heard of it actually taking place.

Certainly happens round my neck of the woods. During the summer months the roads are often full of school children getting advice on riding their cycles.

http://www.suffolkroadsafe.net/cyclists/young-cyclists/
Mike Roberts

fungus
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Location: Dorset

Re: Looking after cyclists

Postby fungus » Tue Sep 20, 2016 9:24 pm

You've hit the nail squarely on the head there in your sentence,"The days when everyone just shared the road, and learnt how to cycle/ride responsibly were much more enlightened."

Unfortunately with the increased use of motorised transport, in many ways due to people working a distance from home, cars being affordable to the majority of the population, the increase in population, and the pressures of modern living, delivery drivers being monitored by their employers etc. aggresion and intolerance has become cosiderably more commonplace as road users vie for space on our ever overcrowded roads.

Nigel.

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Strangely Brown
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Re: Looking after cyclists

Postby Strangely Brown » Tue Sep 20, 2016 9:37 pm

GTR1400MAN wrote:
Mr Cholmondeley-Warner wrote: I remember cycling proficiency taking place in my primary school playground, allegedly now we have something called Bikeability, although I've never heard of it actually taking place.

Certainly happens round my neck of the woods. During the summer months the roads are often full of school children getting advice on riding their cycles.

http://www.suffolkroadsafe.net/cyclists/young-cyclists/


I think I still have my one of these somewhere...

Image

fungus
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Location: Dorset

Re: Looking after cyclists

Postby fungus » Tue Sep 20, 2016 9:51 pm

Strangely Brown wrote:
GTR1400MAN wrote:
Mr Cholmondeley-Warner wrote: I remember cycling proficiency taking place in my primary school playground, allegedly now we have something called Bikeability, although I've never heard of it actually taking place.

Certainly happens round my neck of the woods. During the summer months the roads are often full of school children getting advice on riding their cycles.

http://www.suffolkroadsafe.net/cyclists/young-cyclists/


I think I still have my one of these somewhere...

Image


Just like my wifes, although it's about twentyfive years since she's ridden a bike, and I don't think she'd be very proficient now.

Nigel.

Smeeagain
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Re: Looking after cyclists

Postby Smeeagain » Wed Sep 21, 2016 7:43 am

This is a decent read, but sadly very few cyclists have heard of it. It just isn't well promoted. It's a while since Ive looked at it and I may re-read it.
http://www.cyclecraft.co.uk

Smeeagain
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Re: Looking after cyclists

Postby Smeeagain » Wed Sep 21, 2016 7:46 am

Mr Cholmondeley-Warner wrote:Absolutely not - they encourage car drivers to think they can drive right up to (and over) the edge of the cycle lane, which is usually only a metre wide, or so. Then when cyclists get wise to this and cycle in the main carriageway, they get abuse from car drivers because "you've got a cycle lane, why aren't you in it?". The days when everyone just shared the road, and learnt how to cycle / drive responsibly together, were much more enlightened. I remember cycling proficiency taking place in my primary school playground, allegedly now we have something called Bikeability, although I've never heard of it actually taking place.


So possibly what is required is a cycle lane that is as wide as the 'close passing limit', but bearing in mind a cyclist who is in the middle of the lane isn't then far enough away from passing car (and vice versa), so you'd possibly need an exclusion zone (some nice red tarmac to denote it) that has 'no mans land between the cycle lane and the carriageway, thus giving plenty of room and very obvious if anyone has gone to close. The downside of course is it would make for significantly wider carriageways and could therefore potentially only really be implemented on brand new road building.
Just a thought.

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akirk
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Re: Looking after cyclists

Postby akirk » Wed Sep 21, 2016 8:58 am

Smeeagain wrote:
Mr Cholmondeley-Warner wrote:Absolutely not - they encourage car drivers to think they can drive right up to (and over) the edge of the cycle lane, which is usually only a metre wide, or so. Then when cyclists get wise to this and cycle in the main carriageway, they get abuse from car drivers because "you've got a cycle lane, why aren't you in it?". The days when everyone just shared the road, and learnt how to cycle / drive responsibly together, were much more enlightened. I remember cycling proficiency taking place in my primary school playground, allegedly now we have something called Bikeability, although I've never heard of it actually taking place.


So possibly what is required is a cycle lane that is as wide as the 'close passing limit', but bearing in mind a cyclist who is in the middle of the lane isn't then far enough away from passing car (and vice versa), so you'd possibly need an exclusion zone (some nice red tarmac to denote it) that has 'no mans land between the cycle lane and the carriageway, thus giving plenty of room and very obvious if anyone has gone to close. The downside of course is it would make for significantly wider carriageways and could therefore potentially only really be implemented on brand new road building.
Just a thought.


Our country is simply not big enough for that...
I think you are right it is the logical extension of that approach, but I think we need to go back to basic training for both and stop cyclists and motorists being quite so entitled... there should be no issue in having both on the road if both a) obey the law / HC b) both are considerate... and c) both stop thinking that they own the road...

Alasdair


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