Help for a friend

The first test you do - organised by the government.
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ChristianAB
Posts: 267
Joined: Mon Sep 28, 2015 9:51 pm

Re: Help for a friend

Postby ChristianAB » Sun Jan 10, 2016 7:34 pm

I read somewhere about a study: they tested whether people could actually multi-task whilst driving. The result: it seems only 4% or so of people are able to do it without any measurable impact on their driving.

I am not one of them, but I think Garrison is. Seriously.

Astraist
Posts: 230
Joined: Thu Oct 08, 2015 10:41 pm

Re: Help for a friend

Postby Astraist » Sun Jan 10, 2016 10:39 pm

No surprise there. Humans (and it is a unisex quality) are serial processers. In order to multitask we don't really do two (much less three or more) things simultaneously, we simply switch back and forth between the tasks, but at any given instant we are only doing ONE thing.

The relativelly good multitaskers, don't focus any better on each task. Rather, they differ in how quickly they can shift focus between the two (or more) tasks. Bad multitaskers (and these include the ADD/ADHD lot) again fall not in the virtue of not being able to focus, but being slow at transitioning focus.

My approach to discourage multitasking on the road, is to introduce driving itself not as a single task, but as multitasking in of it's own. Hazards don't necessarily appear one at a time, and both the observational skills (forward and mirrors) and car control (steering, gear, brake/throttle) needed to deal with them involve more than a single action to fulfill.

Rainmaker
Posts: 71
Joined: Tue Jan 12, 2016 11:44 pm
Location: Liverpool

Re: Help for a friend

Postby Rainmaker » Sat Jan 23, 2016 11:42 pm

I know the thread's a bit old now but two things that I wish I' been told when I passed my test jumped out at me with their absence.

1) Don't be intimidated by other road users. For the first few weeks/months/year it's easy to be 'pushed' and bullied down the road. Often times, especially in cities, it's not uncommon for a newly passed driver to be the only person doing the speed limit or less. After a multitude of horn blares, flashed lights and rude gestures because of their 'holding up traffic' there is a temptation to 'join the pack' and start speeding up and rushing into things. Bad idea, especially when you're already struggling to process a lot of information without the backup of your ADI, who until now had been a reassuring voice of authority and wisdom (hopefully) on your shoulder.

2) Get lost. Nothing is better for confidence than giving yourself a couple of hours to randomly point the car in a new direction (out of the city) and getting yourself lost. New roads of varied types, new scenery, and if you go out later/earlier you'll not have to stress about rush-hour traffic breathing down your neck. I spent many happy weekends following this advice in my 1.8 Sierra after passing my test, and my confidence came on leaps and bounds because of it. I also found some lovely country retreats which we still visit to this day!

fungus
Posts: 365
Joined: Sun Dec 13, 2015 5:26 pm
Location: Dorset

Re: Help for a friend

Postby fungus » Thu Feb 25, 2016 9:04 pm

Rainmaker wrote:I know the thread's a bit old now but two things that I wish I' been told when I passed my test jumped out at me with their absence.

1) Don't be intimidated by other road users. For the first few weeks/months/year it's easy to be 'pushed' and bullied down the road. Often times, especially in cities, it's not uncommon for a newly passed driver to be the only person doing the speed limit or less. After a multitude of horn blares, flashed lights and rude gestures because of their 'holding up traffic' there is a temptation to 'join the pack' and start speeding up and rushing into things. Bad idea, especially when you're already struggling to process a lot of information without the backup of your ADI, who until now had been a reassuring voice of authority and wisdom (hopefully) on your shoulder.

2) Get lost. Nothing is better for confidence than giving yourself a couple of hours to randomly point the car in a new direction (out of the city) and getting yourself lost. New roads of varied types, new scenery, and if you go out later/earlier you'll not have to stress about rush-hour traffic breathing down your neck. I spent many happy weekends following this advice in my 1.8 Sierra after passing my test, and my confidence came on leaps and bounds because of it. I also found some lovely country retreats which we still visit to this day!


The advice I give my pupils when they pass their test is to go out at a quiet time of day and only drive familiar easy roads for the first few drives until they start to feel more confident being on their own, and definately leave their friends behind.

Once a learner is at a more advancded (nearing test standard) they are often handed a map and asked to take me to X, Y. or Z as part of introducing them to the real world. Similarly, I often take them into a situation where the car needs to be turned around. It's then up to them how they do it. It doesn't realy matter if the chosen method is not a success, it then becomes a discussion point, eg. "what could you have done to improve this manoeuvre?
Why do you think method A didn't work as well asmethod B? These sessions can do a lot to build independance, you just have to be sure that the pupil is at an advanced enough stage.

Nigel.


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