Travel sickness?

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Horse
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Travel sickness?

Postby Horse » Thu Oct 12, 2017 7:06 pm

Chatting at work today, someone commented that when we were kids, travel sickness was common, but doesn't seem to be now.

What do you reckon?

The only significant difference we could think of was that cars have catalytic converters - I know that exhaust fumes very quickly make me queasy.
My own views. For better or worse :)

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jont-
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Re: Travel sickness?

Postby jont- » Thu Oct 12, 2017 7:41 pm

Cars have climate control, pollen filters, NVH is probably a lot better too. But yes, when the cat was on the way out on the Elise, I did sometimes get stinking headaches. I don't with the Caterham, but that was never designed to have a cat (and I guess I never run with a full roof).

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GTR1400MAN
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Re: Travel sickness?

Postby GTR1400MAN » Thu Oct 12, 2017 8:44 pm

Better suspension/ride?

More glass = better view?

Though for me ultra smooth/wallowy suspension gets me queezey. And ferries :vomit:
Mike Roberts

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jont-
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Re: Travel sickness?

Postby jont- » Fri Oct 13, 2017 4:42 am

GTR1400MAN wrote:More glass = better view?

Modern cars generally have much less glass. Higher door lines, wider pillars.

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Horse
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Re: Travel sickness?

Postby Horse » Fri Oct 13, 2017 6:37 am

jont- wrote:
GTR1400MAN wrote:More glass = better view?

Modern cars generally have much less glass. Higher door lines, wider pillars.


Yes, that was something we mentioned, in fact it was roughly what started the train of discussion, leading on from whether many people will get travel sick in autonomous vehicles.
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GTR1400MAN
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Re: Travel sickness?

Postby GTR1400MAN » Fri Oct 13, 2017 8:14 am

jont- wrote:
GTR1400MAN wrote:More glass = better view?

Modern cars generally have much less glass. Higher door lines, wider pillars.

That may be true relative to the size of the vehicle, but the inside of modern cars are much lighter/roomier and you tend to sit higher so you can see out (or is it just me got taller from when I was a youngster travelling in a homemade kit Watsonian sidecar or back or an A35 Countryman?).
Mike Roberts

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Horse
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Re: Travel sickness?

Postby Horse » Fri Oct 13, 2017 8:30 am

Certainly the 'waist' of cars is higher now relative to the driver.

Image

Image

:)

Cars are bigger 'now' - but also much thicker (eg doors feature impact bars and airbags, etc. It would be interesting to see how internal space has expanded in comparison to external floorplan.

Also pillars are *much* thicker, with windows bonded to the frame rather than in rubber seals, hence the black sections as the adhesive is IIRC weakened by UV.

Image
My own views. For better or worse :)

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AndyP
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Re: Travel sickness?

Postby AndyP » Fri Oct 13, 2017 4:15 pm

I have never really believed in "Car Sickness".
I knew that in the past some of my Rally co drivers used to get it when looking down at the map or notes.

I always found that it was more of a symptom of the drivers use of the controls.

The worst was a guy with a new Company Mitsubishi and his family started getting 'CAR SICK' when going out in it.
Within a few minutes of setting off it was easy to see why.
He constantly 'pulsed' the accelerator pedal in 'auto' And see-sawed at the wheel.

Basically then 'Motion sickness'

When I served as a Aircraft Mechanic on the old Ark Royal it used to corkscrew* in heavy seas and many suffered.
Sea Sickness [or Motion sickness]
*[ The bow used to go up and down and round and round in a counterclockwise direction all at the same time. It was a known stability fault]
It is not WHAT you drive, BUT:-- the WAY that you drive it.
It is not HOW fast you drive, BUT:-- HOW you drive fast.

Cheers Andy

vanman
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Re: Travel sickness?

Postby vanman » Fri Oct 13, 2017 5:06 pm

AndyP wrote:I have never really believed in "Car Sickness".
I knew that in the past some of my Rally co drivers used to get it when looking down at the map or notes.

I always found that it was more of a symptom of the drivers use of the controls.

The worst was a guy with a new Company Mitsubishi and his family started getting 'CAR SICK' when going out in it.
Within a few minutes of setting off it was easy to see why.
He constantly 'pulsed' the accelerator pedal in 'auto' And see-sawed at the wheel.

Basically then 'Motion sickness'

When I served as a Aircraft Mechanic on the old Ark Royal it used to corkscrew* in heavy seas and many suffered.
Sea Sickness [or Motion sickness]
*[ The bow used to go up and down and round and round in a counterclockwise direction all at the same time. It was a known stability fault]


Hello sailor! The Hermes used to do the same :vomit:

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akirk
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Re: Travel sickness?

Postby akirk » Fri Oct 13, 2017 7:53 pm

Amongst friends children travel sickness is still quite prevelant - many children though do grow out of it
Alasdair


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