Breathalysing proceedure

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dvenman
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Re: Breathalysing proceedure

Postby dvenman » Tue Sep 20, 2016 5:49 am

It\s a long time since I breathalysed anyone at the roadside, so this link - http://www.drinkdriving.org/police_brea ... minary.php - explains the process.

It's designed to be as comprehensive as possible, erring (slightly) on the side of caution and thence in the driver's favour.

And while I sympathise with the driver's dilemma in the case of being stopped in Scotland, perhaps a lower limit countrywide would be the answer.

Matt1962
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Re: Breathalysing proceedure

Postby Matt1962 » Tue Sep 20, 2016 2:35 pm

Smeeagain wrote:
Matt1962 wrote:I don't want to encourage drink driving but I think there are a lot of myths around this subject. Is there any documented evidence showing that anyone has ever failed the new Scottish breathalyser test half hour or so after drinking a pint of (normal strength) bitter? Ordered with a meal it seems unlikely that very much alcohol would be detected by the time a breathalyser test could be carried out.


I dont know the accuracy of this link, or if it is the same technology as used here in the UK, but it is interesting nevertheless. And also, you've highlighted one of the myths yourself - food does not dissipate the amount of alcohol in your system - it's still in you. And to deal with that myth, as you will see from the link, the breathalyser is just that - it is analysing your breath to extrapolate that data to an equivalent amount of alcohol in your bloodstream. That is why if you fail the breath test they then offer you (or should offer you) a blood test, which is the more accurate test. Hopefully one of our place driver friends will be along to explain shortly.

http://www.rupissed.com/breathalyser.html

And yes - it is documented that a single pint fails the breath test in Scotland

http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/674646 ... nge-UK-ban

Smee


I don't think that food dissipates the alcohol, just that the time taken to eat it (presumably whilst sipping the pint) allows for some metabolism of the alcohol.
This is why your example seems surprising to me but I suppose some combination of strong beer consumed rapidly followed by immediate testing might be the explanation.

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akirk
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Location: Cotswolds

Re: Breathalysing proceedure

Postby akirk » Tue Sep 20, 2016 2:48 pm

food doesn't remove alcohol - but it does slow down the speed at which it is absorbed into the bloodstream...
alcohol in the bloodstream is the fastest way for it to get around the body (and affect the person), so slowing down that process helps reduce blood in the bloodstream at any one time...

it is also why a blood test is seen as more valid than a breathalyser test - as mentioned above mouthwash has an alcohol content but you gargle and spit it out, so there is minimum absorption into the body - yet maximum affect on the breath test... the blood test is more accurate because alcohol in the blood is where it affects the person, not while on the breath - so a breathalyser is a simple guide, not an accurate result per se...

http://www.knowyourlimits.info/know%E2% ... ohol-works

helps explain it...

Alasdair

martine
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Re: Breathalysing proceedure

Postby martine » Tue Sep 20, 2016 4:02 pm

I believe the police are currently evaluating a portable breath test device which will be 'evidential' - as it's more accurate. This will save the delay in getting to a station, booking someone in and then testing by which time they may be under the limit.
Martin - Bristol IAM: IMI National Observer, Group Secretary, Masters (dist), DSA: ADI, Fleet, RoSPA (Dip)

waremark
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Re: Breathalysing proceedure

Postby waremark » Tue Sep 20, 2016 10:42 pm

akirk wrote:so slowing down that process helps reduce blood in the bloodstream at any one time...

Hopefully not!

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akirk
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Location: Cotswolds

Re: Breathalysing proceedure

Postby akirk » Wed Sep 21, 2016 6:19 am

waremark wrote:
akirk wrote:so slowing down that process helps reduce blood in the bloodstream at any one time...

Hopefully not!


Oops :shock: :D
Possibly reduces alcohol I hope!
Alasdair

michael769
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Joined: Thu Dec 17, 2015 8:36 am

Re: Breathalysing proceedure

Postby michael769 » Sat Oct 15, 2016 7:50 pm

Smeeagain wrote:That is why if you fail the breath test they then offer you (or should offer you) a blood test,


Only if you are a little over the limit in the breath test.

sussex2
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Re: Breathalysing proceedure

Postby sussex2 » Sun Oct 16, 2016 10:27 am

A large percentage of my driving has been done in other European countries and I have become accustomed to random breath tests. I do not drive within 12 hours of drinking any amount of alcohol.
That way I do not have to be concerned with procedures or local practice, or wonder whether something is a myth or not.
No law or rule will dissuade some people and they will go on as long as their luck holds out.


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