Front vs Rear tyre wear

Anything that doesn't fit elsewhere - doesn't have to be AD related.
martine
Posts: 677
Joined: Mon Sep 28, 2015 8:26 am

Front vs Rear tyre wear

Postby martine » Sun Aug 14, 2016 9:14 pm

Why do some FWD cars get through rear tyres quicker than others? I'm not talking about the absolute number of miles as that will vary depending on tyre make etc - but rather the fact sometimes they last much, much longer than the corresponding front.

e.g.
  • Focus ST: front tyres ~ 14k miles, rears ~ 18k.
  • Focus 1 litre 'Ecoboost' (don't laugh): front ~ 20k, rears est. ~ 30k.

What are the factors that govern rear tyre wear compared to front?
Martin - Bristol IAM: IMI National Observer and Group Secretary, DSA: ADI, Fleet, RoSPA (Dip)

Silk
Posts: 383
Joined: Sat Oct 03, 2015 9:24 pm
Location: South Glos.

Re: Front vs Rear tyre wear

Postby Silk » Sun Aug 14, 2016 9:26 pm

martine wrote:Why do some FWD cars get through rear tyres quicker than others? I'm not talking about the absolute number of miles as that will vary depending on tyre make etc - but rather the fact sometimes they last much, much longer than the corresponding front.

e.g.
  • Focus ST: front tyres ~ 14k miles, rears ~ 18k.
  • Focus 1 litre 'Ecoboost' (don't laugh): front ~ 20k, rears est. ~ 30k.

What are the factors that govern rear tyre wear compared to front?


My last half dozen cars have worn their tyres pretty evenly, meaning I replace the whole set at once. Perhaps it's down to driving style. I'm not necessarily saying it's means my driving style is superior in any way (even if it is ;-) ) but it's probably down to the fact that I don't really do the kind of driving that's heavy on tyres. My current car had its first change at around 50K. My A3 got through a set every 20K.

I don't know if it has any bearing, but even tyre wear for me seems to have coincided with the start of my AD journey. Before then, it would be something like 20K front, 60K rear. Different cars, so hardly scientific.

P.S. When you have a Peugeot 308, you don't laugh at an Ecoboost; at least not out loud. :-)

User avatar
GTR1400MAN
Posts: 1169
Joined: Fri Apr 29, 2016 12:23 pm

Re: Front vs Rear tyre wear

Postby GTR1400MAN » Mon Aug 15, 2016 7:29 am

Part of it will down to the geometry. An ST will be set up quite different to a shopping trolley. ;)

Also the ST will probably have some form of stability control where it will be dabbing the rear brakes individually to steer the car. Drive it hard on twisty B roads and this could be your answer. My Civic used to use up rear pads quicker than front, and the rear wheels get more pad dust. However the early new generation Civics were known to have over sensitive/intrusive stability control.
Mike Roberts

Triquet
Posts: 179
Joined: Tue Sep 29, 2015 7:32 pm

Re: Front vs Rear tyre wear

Postby Triquet » Mon Aug 15, 2016 9:50 am

I'm on my fourth Saab 9-5 estate and they are renowned for uneven tyre wear on the back which shortens the life. It is a setting thing and it happens even with factory recommended settings.

User avatar
akirk
Posts: 1408
Joined: Sun Sep 27, 2015 6:58 pm
Location: Cotswolds

Re: Front vs Rear tyre wear

Postby akirk » Mon Aug 15, 2016 10:30 am

my z3 does about 6-8,000 miles on the rears - and probably 8-10,000 on the fronts
I enjoy driving it

the skoda is on 13,000 miles now and no sign of tyres needing to be replaced
I enjoy driving it less

I think there may be a logical link!

Alasdair

TheInsanity1234
Posts: 448
Joined: Fri Oct 02, 2015 8:03 pm

Re: Front vs Rear tyre wear

Postby TheInsanity1234 » Mon Aug 15, 2016 11:45 am

martine wrote:Why do some FWD cars get through rear tyres quicker than others? I'm not talking about the absolute number of miles as that will vary depending on tyre make etc - but rather the fact sometimes they last much, much longer than the corresponding front.

e.g.
  • Focus ST: front tyres ~ 14k miles, rears ~ 18k.
  • Focus 1 litre 'Ecoboost' (don't laugh): front ~ 20k, rears est. ~ 30k.

What are the factors that govern rear tyre wear compared to front?

The most obvious reason would be the fact the rear wheels are simply just rotating on the road, and so won't have as much wear as the front wheels which have a variety of different forces acting on them at different angles etc.

I could have worded that better, but I'm sure the gist is clear enough :help:

Gareth
Posts: 512
Joined: Mon Sep 28, 2015 2:44 pm
Location: Berkshire
Contact:

Re: Front vs Rear tyre wear

Postby Gareth » Mon Aug 15, 2016 11:59 am

martine wrote:What are the factors that govern rear tyre wear compared to front?

I reckon Mike's on the button; more spirited driving probably means more braking and the car is more likely to be leaning in the bends, so the rear tyres are doing more work.
there is only the road, nothing but the road ...

sussex2
Posts: 514
Joined: Mon Sep 28, 2015 11:43 am

Re: Front vs Rear tyre wear

Postby sussex2 » Mon Aug 15, 2016 4:22 pm

martine wrote:Why do some FWD cars get through rear tyres quicker than others? I'm not talking about the absolute number of miles as that will vary depending on tyre make etc - but rather the fact sometimes they last much, much longer than the corresponding front.

e.g.
  • Focus ST: front tyres ~ 14k miles, rears ~ 18k.
  • Focus 1 litre 'Ecoboost' (don't laugh): front ~ 20k, rears est. ~ 30k.

What are the factors that govern rear tyre wear compared to front?


We owned a Focus for five years (never put a foot wrong, not even a light bulb) and it was a Spanish market model which had the ST suspension and the 1.8 diesel.
The tyre wear for what was not a performance car was pretty high and apart from regular servicing just about the only thing replaced.

sussex2
Posts: 514
Joined: Mon Sep 28, 2015 11:43 am

Re: Front vs Rear tyre wear

Postby sussex2 » Mon Aug 15, 2016 4:23 pm

The main problem with rear tyres these days is that they die of old age!

Astraist
Posts: 230
Joined: Thu Oct 08, 2015 10:41 pm

Re: Front vs Rear tyre wear

Postby Astraist » Mon Aug 15, 2016 5:22 pm

It depends on tyre forces.

In a front-heavy, front-wheel driven car you'd expect the front to wear at a much higher rate to the rear. The added load, as well as the majority of braking, accelerating and cornering forces being fed through them.

However, particularly with braking, Electronic Brake Distribution (EBD) system allow for a more balanced brake bias under everyday braking conditions, so tyre (and brake) wear tend to even out a bit more.

Anyhow, I find that most tyres, if properly inflated and aligned, degrade and lose performance to a degree that justifies replacing them, long before the tread reaches the 3-milimeter limit.


Return to “General Chat”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest