Citigo - 300 miles later.

Anything that doesn't fit elsewhere - doesn't have to be AD related.
TheInsanity1234
Posts: 497
Joined: Fri Oct 02, 2015 8:03 pm

Citigo - 300 miles later.

Postby TheInsanity1234 » Fri May 20, 2016 9:37 pm

So, as the title alludes to, I've covered more than 300 miles in my Citigo in the last week and couple of days I've had it.

Image
(I pulled into a convenient field entrance on my way to 6th form this morning, in order to take the picture, but I was jutting out into the road very slightly, so put my hazards on to ensure any unsuspecting drivers would see me, if they'd previously failed to miss the offensively red metal box against the greenery :mrgreen:)

My summary so far:
It's great. Literally. I love driving it.

The engine is very perky, but I've had a few occasions where I go to accelerate, and it seems to do nothing, then I suddenly remember I'm in 4th in a 30, so I change down to 3rd and off I go.

I've already performed a few overtakes in the car, and it's alright, but planning is important, as is a good knowledge of the road ahead.

I've driven it on the motorway too, and it is very relaxed at *ahem* 70 plus a bit. It isn't really designed for motorway driving, with a small free revving petrol rather than a beefy diesel, but it takes them in its stride.

It is a complete contrast to the Yeti, having the torque at 3k to 4k rpm, whereas the Yeti produces its maximum torque between 2k and 3k rpm, but the Citigo has got enough low end torque that it's relatively difficult to stall, and it can cruise easily at low rpm.

The gearbox is incredibly light, as is the clutch. The steering is fairly nice, and as you'd expect, it is quite good fun to drive on twisty roads, but it's easy enough to drive on the Oxfordshire special Used-To-Be-NSL-Now-Is-50 roads.

The only downsides are, no parking sensors, and no cruise control. But the more I park the car, the less of an issue the lack of parking sensors are, and the cruise control is a feature I probably won't be missing too much as the Citigo is not intended to be driven thousands of miles around the motorway networks. There isn't a trip computer in the instrument cluster, as it's a paid for extra, but I honestly don't miss it, as the PID (Portable Infotainment Device) doubles up as a trip computer, as well as being a sat nav, media player and a bluetooth link.

Speaking as a deaf person, I'm certainly no audiophile :mrgreen: but the radio is perfectly acceptable to me, it has enough clarity and bass for me to listen to music on the move, not that I will be doing so frequently.

This is just a short review of my car, and is in no way intended to be a exhaustive essay... (mainly because I can't be bothered to write much more), but if you have any questions, please feel free to ask away!

User avatar
GTR1400MAN
Posts: 1317
Joined: Fri Apr 29, 2016 12:23 pm

Re: Citigo - 300 miles later.

Postby GTR1400MAN » Fri May 20, 2016 10:26 pm

Yet another UK car where the speedo doesn't have a 30mph figure ... just a mark half way between 20 and 40. My wife's Yaris is just the same. Coupled with Red on Black design it is almost illegible for someone who's colour blind, like me (red/black colour blindness is very common).
Mike Roberts

Imsensible
Posts: 91
Joined: Sun Apr 24, 2016 9:41 pm
Location: Here
Contact:

Re: Citigo - 300 miles later.

Postby Imsensible » Fri May 20, 2016 11:43 pm

Glad you're enjoying it. It's a tidy little car, with a very characterful engine. Try not to go too mad with that right pedal ;)

As for this fallacy that some cars aren't designed for motorway driving? Honestly, people have been driving cars on the motorways for decades. Cars of the 70s, 80s and early 90s were often less powerful than your Citigo, less reliable, less fuel efficient, less comfortable and less refined. Trust me, they managed. We're just a bit spoiled these days :)

Your car will sit at 70mph on the motorway all day long, assuming you have fuel. You'll get bored long before the car does.

They managed without parking sensors and cruise control too ;)

Have fun!

TheInsanity1234
Posts: 497
Joined: Fri Oct 02, 2015 8:03 pm

Re: Citigo - 300 miles later.

Postby TheInsanity1234 » Sat May 21, 2016 12:13 am

GTR1400MAN wrote:Yet another UK car where the speedo doesn't have a 30mph figure ... just a mark half way between 20 and 40. My wife's Yaris is just the same. Coupled with Red on Black design it is almost illegible for someone who's colour blind, like me (red/black colour blindness is very common).

My mum was annoyed by it when she picked up her Yeti as it didn't have a 30 figure, but after a couple of hours, she got used to it. Same with me, I was used to my instructor's Micra having a nice big 30 marked out on the speedometer, but now I've been driving the Yeti for a year, and my own car, and I honestly can't say it bothers me.

However, I do find it odd that they didn't put the odd tens on, as it's not like there's a lack of space! In the Yeti, it's understandable as the speedometer is quite small, so the numbering could get a bit crowded, but there's no chance of that happening on the Citigo's speedometer!

Imsensible wrote:Glad you're enjoying it. It's a tidy little car, with a very characterful engine. Try not to go too mad with that right pedal ;)

As for this fallacy that some cars aren't designed for motorway driving? Honestly, people have been driving cars on the motorways for decades. Cars of the 70s, 80s and early 90s were often less powerful than your Citigo, less reliable, less fuel efficient, less comfortable and less refined. Trust me, they managed. We're just a bit spoiled these days :)

Your car will sit at 70mph on the motorway all day long, assuming you have fuel. You'll get bored long before the car does.

They managed without parking sensors and cruise control too ;)

Have fun!

I am taking it easy for the time being, as it's still being run in according to the manual. At 620 odd miles, I can start to open the engine and take it up to the red line more regularly!

And I have to admit, we are spoilt in terms of technology in the modern age, but the one thing that doesn't make sense to me is the fact on the SE L (Top spec), which is what I've got, heated front seats are standard, but cruise control is an optional extra. I'd rather it was the other way around!

But never mind, the only time I used cruise control was in the 50 zones on the motorways. I guess I'll just go behind the lorries then :mrgreen:

Imsensible
Posts: 91
Joined: Sun Apr 24, 2016 9:41 pm
Location: Here
Contact:

Re: Citigo - 300 miles later.

Postby Imsensible » Sat May 21, 2016 12:35 am

Trust me, in the middle of winter when it's well below freezing, those heated seats will be very welcome. Of course, that warm feeling could just mean that the car is on fire. In which case, you really would have a hot hatch!

Gareth
Posts: 574
Joined: Mon Sep 28, 2015 2:44 pm
Location: Berkshire
Contact:

Re: Citigo - 300 miles later.

Postby Gareth » Sat May 21, 2016 3:34 am

TheInsanity1234 wrote:I've already performed a few overtakes in the car, and it's alright, but planning is important, as is a good knowledge of the road ahead.

Just in case I've misunderstood, you shouldn't need any special knowledge of the road ahead other than you can see or have seen. If you overtake based on prior knowledge, then you're carrying risk that things aren't quite the same as they were previous times you took that route.
there is only the road, nothing but the road ...

User avatar
Synchromesh
Posts: 42
Joined: Mon Sep 28, 2015 7:52 pm

Re: Citigo - 300 miles later.

Postby Synchromesh » Sat May 21, 2016 10:12 am

Glad you're enjoying the car Insanity! Bit late now, but I think there's a 'comfort pack' which includes parking sensors, cruise and a trip computer...

Once the running in mileage is complete, you should find the car feels a bit perkier with the full rev range at your disposal.

Imsensible wrote:Trust me, in the middle of winter when it's well below freezing, those heated seats will be very welcome. Of course, that warm feeling could just mean that the car is on fire. In which case, you really would have a hot hatch!

:lol:

waremark
Posts: 581
Joined: Fri Oct 02, 2015 9:23 am

Re: Citigo - 300 miles later.

Postby waremark » Sat May 21, 2016 12:30 pm

Gareth wrote:
TheInsanity1234 wrote:I've already performed a few overtakes in the car, and it's alright, but planning is important, as is a good knowledge of the road ahead.

Just in case I've misunderstood, you shouldn't need any special knowledge of the road ahead other than you can see or have seen. If you overtake based on prior knowledge, then you're carrying risk that things aren't quite the same as they were previous times you took that route.

Took the words out of my mouth (well, thumb). To overtake safely you don't only need to not see any conflict, you also need to be able to see that there is no potential for conflict. You need to be able to see the whole of the road surface and the verges on both sides for about three times the distance your overtake will take.

But you are lucky to have such a nice car and I am sure you already drive it better than most would.

User avatar
Mr Cholmondeley-Warner
Posts: 1074
Joined: Sun Sep 27, 2015 7:01 pm
Location: Swindon

Re: Citigo - 300 miles later.

Postby Mr Cholmondeley-Warner » Sat May 21, 2016 1:00 pm

Gareth wrote:
TheInsanity1234 wrote:I've already performed a few overtakes in the car, and it's alright, but planning is important, as is a good knowledge of the road ahead.

Just in case I've misunderstood, you shouldn't need any special knowledge of the road ahead other than you can see or have seen. If you overtake based on prior knowledge, then you're carrying risk that things aren't quite the same as they were previous times you took that route.

Or to paraphrase, drive the road each time as if you'd never been along it, and treat each hazard on its merits. Enjoy! :D
Nick

fungus
Posts: 439
Joined: Sun Dec 13, 2015 5:26 pm
Location: Dorset

Re: Citigo - 300 miles later.

Postby fungus » Sat May 21, 2016 8:20 pm

Mr Cholmondeley-Warner wrote:
Gareth wrote:
TheInsanity1234 wrote:I've already performed a few overtakes in the car, and it's alright, but planning is important, as is a good knowledge of the road ahead.

Just in case I've misunderstood, you shouldn't need any special knowledge of the road ahead other than you can see or have seen. If you overtake based on prior knowledge, then you're carrying risk that things aren't quite the same as they were previous times you took that route.

Or to paraphrase, drive the road each time as if you'd never been along it, and treat each hazard on its merits. Enjoy! :D


I find this with learners. Once their confidence grows they tend to enter hazards too quick in the areas they know. Put them in an unfamiliar area, and they drive according to conditions. It's not just learners though. Most drivers don't drive the road. Complacency sets in on familiar routes.

Nigel.


Return to “General Chat”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests