So do you know the Highway Code?

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TheInsanity1234
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Re: So do you know the Highway Code?

Postby TheInsanity1234 » Mon Oct 12, 2015 4:16 pm

hir wrote:I only got 10 out of 10 because, against my better judgement, I was able to answer correctly the bonkers suggestion in the Highway Code that one should use the left-hand lane on a motorway or dual-carriageway "at all times except when overtaking"!

Well... That is what you do...?

Unless you're taking it literally, and you mean you can't use the left lane if there's roadworks occupying it, or if there's an accident occupying it or indeed, a Traffic Womble.

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akirk
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Re: So do you know the Highway Code?

Postby akirk » Mon Oct 12, 2015 4:50 pm

TheInsanity1234 wrote:
hir wrote:I only got 10 out of 10 because, against my better judgement, I was able to answer correctly the bonkers suggestion in the Highway Code that one should use the left-hand lane on a motorway or dual-carriageway "at all times except when overtaking"!

Well... That is what you do...?

Unless you're taking it literally, and you mean you can't use the left lane if there's roadworks occupying it, or if there's an accident occupying it or indeed, a Traffic Womble.


or as I do regularly...
drive in the right lane approaching an intersection to turn across to come home...

I think that the point might be that often answers are not that simple...

Alasdair

hir
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Re: So do you know the Highway Code?

Postby hir » Mon Oct 12, 2015 6:00 pm

TheInsanity1234 wrote:
hir wrote:I only got 10 out of 10 because, against my better judgement, I was able to answer correctly the bonkers suggestion in the Highway Code that one should use the left-hand lane on a motorway or dual-carriageway "at all times except when overtaking"!

Well... That is what you do...?



Not necessarily, it just depends. we're supposed to be thinking drivers, not automatons.

Picture this, it's on a dual carriageway near me: a two lane NSL dual carriageway; a sweeping left curve ahead; there is no visibility across the curve because of high hedges and trees along the roadside; the curve is gentle enough that it is possible to transit this curve at 70mph and still be able to stop in your lane in the distance seen to be clear; a blue information sign says "P", Parking a quarter of a mile ahead (ie. a layby); there's nothing in lanes 1 and 2 ahead; there's nothing coming up behind in lane 2; you can't see the layby because it's around the bend and out of sight. So...

... do you,

1. Stay in lane 1 through the curve and hope that no one is emerging from the layby when you get there. If you're good at anticipation then your observation of the sign will have enabled you to plan for the possibility that when the layby comes into view there might be a vehicle, possibly an LGV, emerging from the layby. And, if you're doing 70mph, you'll have built into your driving plan the probability that you'll need to brake firmly or move rapidly to lane 2 (that'll be OK because you know there is nothing coming up behind in lane 2), or...

2. Stay in lane 1 and reduce your speed to 50 or 60 mph in order to reduce the firm braking, or mitigate the action of quickly changing lanes, in the event of having to do so, or...

3. Anticipate that there might be an as yet unseen vehicle emerging from the layby. Move to lane 2 to extend your view around the left-hand curve and in doing so move your vehicle to a place of safety away from the anticipated vehicle emerging into lane 1. If there is a vehicle emerging into lane 1 there is nothing further you need to do because you've already done all that is necessary, if there isn't anyone emerging from the layby nothing is lost and you will, at the very least, have extended your vision through the curve.

I'd be interested to read an explanation as to why option 1 or option 2 would be preferable to option 3.

Of course it might be argued that the scenario and resultant actions that I've described in option 3 above is simply an anticipated overtake. One which might, or might not, happen. So, in that sense it's simply following the Highway Code advice anyway. However, the following slightly different situation doesn't anticipate an overtake it simply moves the vehicle to a place of safety.

This time picture a straight piece of dual-carriageway, with all the other conditions the same as for the earlier scenario noted above, but this time instead of a layby, imagine you can see a junction on the left approx. a quarter of a mile ahead into which the view is restricted. At this distance you can see that the junction is empty but you can't see if there is a vehicle approaching the junction from the left. The same three options noted above are available.

I would again suggest the best option would be option 3; move to lane 2 in anticipation.

gannet
Posts: 178
Joined: Mon Sep 28, 2015 10:23 am

Re: So do you know the Highway Code?

Postby gannet » Mon Oct 12, 2015 9:07 pm

Some lovely options to choose there...

9/10 here, not sure which one be tripped me up though...

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Mr Cholmondeley-Warner
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Re: So do you know the Highway Code?

Postby Mr Cholmondeley-Warner » Tue Oct 13, 2015 7:46 am

Scroll back through the test and it'll be red...
Nick

gannet
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Re: So do you know the Highway Code?

Postby gannet » Tue Oct 13, 2015 8:16 am

Mr Cholmondeley-Warner wrote:Scroll back through the test and it'll be red...

oh, bit late now...

redid it though - braking distances - I over remembered ;)

sussex2
Posts: 514
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Re: So do you know the Highway Code?

Postby sussex2 » Tue Oct 13, 2015 10:00 am

hir wrote:
TheInsanity1234 wrote:
hir wrote:I only got 10 out of 10 because, against my better judgement, I was able to answer correctly the bonkers suggestion in the Highway Code that one should use the left-hand lane on a motorway or dual-carriageway "at all times except when overtaking"!

Well... That is what you do...?



Not necessarily, it just depends. we're supposed to be thinking drivers, not automatons.

Picture this, it's on a dual carriageway near me: a two lane NSL dual carriageway; a sweeping left curve ahead; there is no visibility across the curve because of high hedges and trees along the roadside; the curve is gentle enough that it is possible to transit this curve at 70mph and still be able to stop in your lane in the distance seen to be clear; a blue information sign says "P", Parking a quarter of a mile ahead (ie. a layby); there's nothing in lanes 1 and 2 ahead; there's nothing coming up behind in lane 2; you can't see the layby because it's around the bend and out of sight. So...

... do you,

1. Stay in lane 1 through the curve and hope that no one is emerging from the layby when you get there. If you're good at anticipation then your observation of the sign will have enabled you to plan for the possibility that when the layby comes into view there might be a vehicle, possibly an LGV, emerging from the layby. And, if you're doing 70mph, you'll have built into your driving plan the probability that you'll need to brake firmly or move rapidly to lane 2 (that'll be OK because you know there is nothing coming up behind in lane 2), or...

2. Stay in lane 1 and reduce your speed to 50 or 60 mph in order to reduce the firm braking, or mitigate the action of quickly changing lanes, in the event of having to do so, or...

3. Anticipate that there might be an as yet unseen vehicle emerging from the layby. Move to lane 2 to extend your view around the left-hand curve and in doing so move your vehicle to a place of safety away from the anticipated vehicle emerging into lane 1. If there is a vehicle emerging into lane 1 there is nothing further you need to do because you've already done all that is necessary, if there isn't anyone emerging from the layby nothing is lost and you will, at the very least, have extended your vision through the curve.

I'd be interested to read an explanation as to why option 1 or option 2 would be preferable to option 3.

Of course it might be argued that the scenario and resultant actions that I've described in option 3 above is simply an anticipated overtake. One which might, or might not, happen. So, in that sense it's simply following the Highway Code advice anyway. However, the following slightly different situation doesn't anticipate an overtake it simply moves the vehicle to a place of safety.

This time picture a straight piece of dual-carriageway, with all the other conditions the same as for the earlier scenario noted above, but this time instead of a layby, imagine you can see a junction on the left approx. a quarter of a mile ahead into which the view is restricted. At this distance you can see that the junction is empty but you can't see if there is a vehicle approaching the junction from the left. The same three options noted above are available.

I would again suggest the best option would be option 3; move to lane 2 in anticipation.


Given that few people would bother to scan three lanes before moving out I'd probably stick with moving to lane 2 in anticipation with a plan to go to 3 if necessary. I would want to stand a reasonable chance of being seen, plus a bit more for leeway.
Imagine there was a roundabout a bit further down the road and matey in the layby had stopped to consult a battered 1984 AA map; he/she then finds that a right turn will be necessary at the said roundabout and swoops to lane 3.
If that were to happen and you are already in lane three you can only go one way; staying in 2 in anticipation gives more options.

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Mr Cholmondeley-Warner
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Re: So do you know the Highway Code?

Postby Mr Cholmondeley-Warner » Tue Oct 13, 2015 10:27 am

Where is this "lane 3" of which you speak? Hir specifically said it was a D/C. Very few of them have 3 lanes. Hir didn't say his did, in fact it's pretty clear from his text that there are only 2.
Nick

sussex2
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Joined: Mon Sep 28, 2015 11:43 am

Re: So do you know the Highway Code?

Postby sussex2 » Tue Oct 13, 2015 12:50 pm

I don't know where I got that from having read it again!
Excuse me but at least there was some kind of plan :)

titian
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Joined: Fri Oct 02, 2015 9:26 am

Re: So do you know the Highway Code?

Postby titian » Wed Oct 14, 2015 12:42 pm

I will always default to lane 2 in the D/C example.

I will drive up to the limit, 70mph, road and traffic conditions permitting, and with a careful eye on the mirrors maintain my position unless a faster vehicle approached from behind, in which case I would return to lane 1 whilst it passed then, if clear again return to lane 2.

Considerations that may cause me to amend my position include the sate of the separator between carriageways, the direction and inclination of the road and is it daytime or nighttime and what affect my high beam headlight may have on approaching traffic in the opposite carriageway.

Pull that apart! :D


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