Pavement Parking

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onlinegenie
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Pavement Parking

Postby onlinegenie » Tue Apr 19, 2016 12:00 pm

http://www.thetimes.co.uk/tto/news/uk/a ... b88f15eb09

We should adopt the Danish system. The pavements are two tone and drivers are allowed to park only on the outer edge.
Mark Syder (like the drink only not spelled the same way)

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jont-
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Re: Pavement Parking

Postby jont- » Tue Apr 19, 2016 12:05 pm

Hmmm. Build lots of new houses with inadequate parking because "/green/".
Introduce parking permits for pavement parking
.....
Profit ?

I'd like to adopt the system that has a minimum of 1 parking space per bedroom for new developments. Just like companies should be allowed to provide as much parking as needed unless councils can demonstrate an availability of either housing or suitable public transport locally.

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StressedDave
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Re: Pavement Parking

Postby StressedDave » Tue Apr 19, 2016 2:01 pm

You are aware that the government defines a particular density of housing in new estates aren't you and that 1 space per bedroom could not possibly tally with that density.

And I think you'll find that companies these days are forced by the planners to provide sufficient car parking spaces as part of the planning permission on new developments.
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trashbat
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Re: Pavement Parking

Postby trashbat » Tue Apr 19, 2016 2:30 pm

I don't understand how it's not illegal already.

It's illegal to drive on the pavement except over a dropped kerb to access a property, so...

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Horse
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Re: Pavement Parking

Postby Horse » Tue Apr 19, 2016 2:33 pm

Exceeding the speed limit is illegal, but that doesn't stop people doing it ;) So . . . we call it 'making safe progress' to give it respectability ;)
My own views. For better or worse :)

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jont-
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Re: Pavement Parking

Postby jont- » Tue Apr 19, 2016 2:43 pm

StressedDave wrote:You are aware that the government defines a particular density of housing in new estates aren't you and that 1 space per bedroom could not possibly tally with that density.

And I think you'll find that companies these days are forced by the planners to provide sufficient car parking spaces as part of the planning permission on new developments.

So reduce the density to something more amenable to a pleasant life? The last 20 years of developments have shown that providing insufficient parking doesn't stop car ownership, it just leaves roads of housing estates riddled with vehicles.

Our company has been told by the planners we're only allowed significantly less parking than would be desirable on a new development (hence lots of sticks trying to beat people into car sharing rather than paying staff enough to live nearby :twisted: )

waremark
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Re: Pavement Parking

Postby waremark » Tue Apr 19, 2016 4:49 pm

StressedDave wrote:And I think you'll find that companies these days are forced by the planners to provide sufficient car parking spaces as part of the planning permission on new developments.

A son lives in a new build block in London. Planning prevented the provision of any parking, and there is no entitlement to residents parking for any new build in the area. The outcome is probably what they want - fewer cars in London.

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angus
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Re: Pavement Parking

Postby angus » Tue Apr 19, 2016 8:07 pm

jont- wrote: I'd like to adopt the system that has a minimum of 1 parking space per bedroom for new developments. Just like companies should be allowed to provide as much parking as needed unless councils can demonstrate an availability of either housing or suitable public transport locally.


Fair enough. When we put an extension on our house, one of the questions was: "you'll have 5 bedroms, do you have 5 parking spaces?"

But at the same time they were building 4/5 bedroom houses in the village with a small single garage and a parking space in front

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Discov8
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Re: Pavement Parking

Postby Discov8 » Tue Apr 19, 2016 8:24 pm

I live in an outer London borough where travelling radially ie in or out of London has good public transport, if over crowded. If you want to travel by public transport in other directions then it's more of a problem. Having lived in Berlin and Prague for several years you can get practically anywhere in less than 45 mins by public transport. I could manage without a car in Berlin and Prague for commuting but not in outer London.

I've lived in outer London for over twenty years and the local authorities introduced resident permit street parking several years ago with a rising scale of charges for each car at an address. First car is £40 per year rising to over £140 for the fourth vehicle. It is not uncommon for houses to have between two and six cars at a family home, especially with children staying at home longer due to high property rental prices. Any cars that can't be parked off the street results in an easy income for the council and the traffic wardens are fanatical at enforcing public and resident parking infringements.

New builds, especially apartments, in Berlin and Prague must have sufficient resident parking which is achieved by gated secure underground parking. New builds where I live follow the same minimal surface parking with a greater potential for damage or theft and increases the demand for street parking; congesting the roads further.

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StressedDave
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Re: Pavement Parking

Postby StressedDave » Wed Apr 20, 2016 7:37 am

Creating underground parking is a bit of an issue in London; £10k per metre for contiguous piling, £1k per 20m³ of muckaway just to get the hole in the ground. Then expensive basement tanking system (water in London really loves voids because the Clay the place sits on is impermeable), extract system, longer lift shafts and the fact that your rich neighbours don't want the noise from a big auger piling rig, myriad lorry movements and the general disruption. It's actually quite hard to make underground parking pay, which is why most places try not to have it.

Glad I design mainly in Cambridgeshire... At least there you know that the City Council are suitably right-on to discourage parking for residential properties on the usual grounds in the NPPF - and JonT's problem with not enough parking at his companies new building is down to the NPPF too. The Council have to look at the accessibility before setting a parking level and the area is allegedly well served by public transport. The fact that all the employees can't live anywhere near the public transport is neither here nor there.
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