One of the dozen

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Silk
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Location: South Glos.

Re: One of the dozen

Postby Silk » Mon May 16, 2016 7:41 pm

Mr Cholmondeley-Warner wrote:What do I think? Well, you're either telling porkies, or you're a hypocrite who preaches one thing and practises another.

What do you do when the cyclist doesn't understand your hierarchy of road users and kneel by the roadside, bowing down as you pass - follow them, swearing to yourself, or something more aggressive?


How many times have you been told not to feed the trolls? Look, I've even put up a bloody great big sign. :lol:

(burp!)

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Horse
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Re: One of the dozen

Postby Horse » Mon May 16, 2016 8:04 pm

Mr Cholmondeley-Warner wrote:
Silk wrote:
Mr Cholmondeley-Warner wrote:IIRC you are, or were, an Observer for the IAM. Do you teach your candidates this same intolerant attitude to other types of road user? For example, do you teach them to expect cyclists to, as you put it, "voluntarily move into the ditch to make way for them"? How do you coach them to encourage this self-abasement? By aggressive use of the horn, perhaps?


What do you think? Seriously now. :lol:

You also need to look up the word "voluntarily".

What do I think? Well, you're either telling porkies, or you're a hypocrite who preaches one thing and practises another.

What do you do when the cyclist doesn't understand your hierarchy of road users and kneel by the roadside, bowing down as you pass - follow them, swearing to yourself, or something more aggressive?


Don't forget that the younger cyclists may find it difficult to accurately judge speed of approach, so may 'miss' with their bowing and scraping.
My own views. For better or worse :)

Silk
Posts: 383
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Location: South Glos.

Re: One of the dozen

Postby Silk » Mon May 16, 2016 8:27 pm

Horse wrote:Don't forget that the younger cyclists may find it difficult to accurately judge speed of approach, so may 'miss' with their bowing and scraping.


If they have the difficulties described, then they shouldn't be on the road in the first place.

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Horse
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Re: One of the dozen

Postby Horse » Mon May 16, 2016 8:37 pm

Silk wrote:
Horse wrote:Don't forget that the younger cyclists may find it difficult to accurately judge speed of approach, so may 'miss' with their bowing and scraping.


If they have the difficulties described, then they shouldn't be on the road in the first place.


Its not a difficulty, it's part of normal brain development* That's why drivers have to take a test, isn't it, to see whether they can be trusted?

* Similar to the frontal lobe of the brain - which deals with some fairly important stuff - which doesn't typically develop until someone is in their twenties.
My own views. For better or worse :)

Silk
Posts: 383
Joined: Sat Oct 03, 2015 9:24 pm
Location: South Glos.

Re: One of the dozen

Postby Silk » Mon May 16, 2016 9:12 pm

Horse wrote:
Silk wrote:
Horse wrote:Don't forget that the younger cyclists may find it difficult to accurately judge speed of approach, so may 'miss' with their bowing and scraping.


If they have the difficulties described, then they shouldn't be on the road in the first place.


Its not a difficulty, it's part of normal brain development* That's why drivers have to take a test, isn't it, to see whether they can be trusted?

* Similar to the frontal lobe of the brain - which deals with some fairly important stuff - which doesn't typically develop until someone is in their twenties.


You seem to be making the case for banning some cyclists. What would your criteria be for being allowed to ride a bicycle on the road? Should there be an age limit? Should they require a licence? Explain.

fungus
Posts: 413
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Location: Dorset

Re: One of the dozen

Postby fungus » Mon May 16, 2016 9:16 pm

We get Gypsies thrashing their horse and trap down the A35 Upton by pass dual carriageway which is subject to the NSL as is the A31 Ferndown by pass which had a Gypsy thrashing his horse and trap down it on Sunday last week. Both of these roads carry HGVs and the A31 in particular is busy on a Sunday afternoon with heavy traffic heading back to London.

Incidently, it is legal for powered mobility scooters to use an NSL dual carriageway provided that they display a flashing amber beacon on one with a speed limit of 50mph or more. These scooters have a maximum speed of 8mph.

fungus
Posts: 413
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Location: Dorset

Re: One of the dozen

Postby fungus » Mon May 16, 2016 9:17 pm

Imsensible wrote:
fungus wrote:Thank you Silk for you usual bout of diplomacy.

Nick is correct. Now here's the but. I have had experience of a cyclist riding out from behind a blind wall into the NS of my car. There was no way in which the driver, a learner, or myself could have foreseen this event. See the link below for a street veiw of the incident site. And before anyone says that it's my fault for taking a ton of motorised metal out on the road, it was taxed, insured, and the driver was appropriately licenced. Therefore we had a right to be there. The cyclist rode out from behind the wall on the left just before the road comes in from the left as we were driving past, into the side of my car.

I am, beleive it or not, of sane mind. If I walk out into the path of a motorised vehicle giving the driver no chance to avoid me, does that make the driver guilty. I think not. It's my fault for being so bloody stupid. Now, I accept that the posters on this forum would probably consider that there is the posibility that I might have learning difficulty and not be able to take responsibility for my actions and would adjust their speed and position to accomodate that possibility, something that Mr/Mrs average might not do. Blame can only be apportioned by reason and not just because one road user is more vulnerable than the other. If it is proven beyond reasonable doubt that the less vulnerable road took allreasonable steps to prevent the accident, then why should it be assumed by certain groups that the more vulnerable is not to blame. That would give them carte blanche the right to do as they like without consequence to their actions. IMHO there are so many grey areas to consider.

https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@50.80201 ... 312!8i6656

Nigel.


And how many motorists crash in to the side of other cars? Having the right to be there doesn't exclude the possibility of stupidity on your or anybody else's part. Including cyclists, pedestrians and low flying birds. You might want to ask how many cyclists DON'T crash in to cars, despite the stupidity of many motorists.


And the point being?

Nigel.

Imsensible
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Re: One of the dozen

Postby Imsensible » Mon May 16, 2016 11:04 pm

I'll let you work it out for yourself, you should be able to do it. You might have to re-read some of the preceding comments. I had the same question about your last post, but decided not to ask directly. What exactly was your point?

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Horse
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Re: One of the dozen

Postby Horse » Tue May 17, 2016 7:00 am

Silk wrote:
Horse wrote:
Silk wrote:
Horse wrote:Don't forget that the younger cyclists may find it difficult to accurately judge speed of approach, so may 'miss' with their bowing and scraping.


If they have the difficulties described, then they shouldn't be on the road in the first place.


Its not a difficulty, it's part of normal brain development* That's why drivers have to take a test, isn't it, to see whether they can be trusted?

* Similar to the frontal lobe of the brain - which deals with some fairly important stuff - which doesn't typically develop until someone is in their twenties.


You seem to be making the case for banning some cyclists. What would your criteria be for being allowed to ride a bicycle on the road? Should there be an age limit? Should they require a licence? Explain.


As I'm sure you realise, I'm emphasising the case for responsible driving, accepting the presence of others.
My own views. For better or worse :)

TripleS
Posts: 227
Joined: Tue Sep 29, 2015 5:39 pm
Location: Briggswath

Re: One of the dozen

Postby TripleS » Tue May 17, 2016 5:12 pm

Mr Cholmondeley-Warner wrote:I think, Mr Sensible, you need to re-quote Dave's post, which I have just re-read, and highlight exactly which parts of it you find to be disturbing, for whatever reasons you are harbouring. I can't find anything that isn't factual. Yes, I know Dave as well. I know how seriously he takes driving-according-to-the-conditions, but even knowing all that, I can't actually read his words the way you do.


Nor can I. What SD said was perfectly reasonable in my view.


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